Affiliate Marketing Facts Is There Any New Or Revolutionary About The Online Business

There are more and more people who are aware of the potential that the internet has to offer. As the business is being done on the internet, some people will start to think that the person must be a technical person or IT savvy before he will be able to start his own online business. Some will even think that it is a business that will requires a totally different strategies. But is there really any new or revolutionary about the online business?

The actual fact is that it is still a year old business of selling products or services in exchange of money but it are being viewed form a new angle. You will still need to sell something in order to get a income from it.

The only difference is that you have a website that sells the product instead of a physical store. You will still need to get people to view your offer, give customer support if the customer faces any problems with the product and following up with your customer to build a relationship with them.

You will need to keep in mind that the basic business and marketing principle will still apply to the online business. You will still have to commit your time, money and effort into growing your own profitable business.

Forget about finding the secrets to making money overnight as it will never exist. There is no free lunch in this world and you will have to invest your commitment to your business before you will be able to see the result. So start to follow a proven system and take massive action today.

Zack Lim is an internet affiliate marketer who owns http://www.MyAffiliateMarketingOnline.com/FreeEcourse. He has helped hundreds of people to start their own affiliate marketing business.

He’s recently developed a free e-course showing you a step by step process for starting your own affiliate marketing business easier. To learn how to start your own affiliate marketing business without wasting your time and money, visit http://www.MyAffiliateMarketingOnline.com/FreeEcourse

A Revolutionary Home Based Business Opportunity

A home based business opportunity sounds like such a great way to make some extra money. In fact millions of people go on the internet thinking that their financial worries will soon be over. They have dreams of telling their boss that they quit. They start making plans to buy that new car and even a new house. I know because that was me two years ago.

When the first work from home business opportunity that promised me that I would soon be retired didn’t work out, I just joined another one. And then another one. And before I knew Continue reading “A Revolutionary Home Based Business Opportunity”

Marketing Your Own Products

One of the main problems within the “inner circle” of the mail order business is that everyone is selling everyone else’s products. Pages crammed full with commission dealerships is turning a good thing out of hand.

It’s been said over and over again, but newcomers to the industry should realize that they need to develop their own products and services. Commission dealerships are fine to compliment your business if the product is relative to your main product, but everyone should strive for developing their OWN product too. No one will ever get rich dealing in just commission dealer-ships. And people who think this way will give up over a period of time because they go broke. Let’s stop this madness and spread the word about becoming a Prime Source.

How do you develop your own specialized product or service? It may take a few months to get your “feet wet” in mail order to determine your particular “niche.” However, you should already know the talents you possess inside yourself and what your own capabilities are. There has to be more to your business than making money!What are your hobbies and interests? What would you like to do more than anything else and would you do it if you were not getting paid?

Perhaps you would rather write, edit, paste-up or seal envelopes. Dorothy Christian (Shells 345) once explained the “high” she used to get when doing a mass mailing. She loved peeling off labels, sticking them on envelopes and folding the materials to insert. She said that every envelope she stuffed, she felt it would generate a big customer order. This is enthusiasm!

Therefore, Dorothy could have developed a specialized or confidential mailing service. Unlike a big mail where she would be mailing circulars in envelopes, but a targeted-mailing for different programs and products. (Example: A circular selling books and reports would be marketed only to book buyers from lists Dorothy would purchase and use for these types of mailings. She also would be careful not to put any conflicting information in this special mailing she was preparing for specific customers.)

You can take anything you sell and creatively turn it into your own prime source product. A good friend of mine, Helen VanAllen loved to prepare big mails so she created the “Design-Your-Own-Big-Mail-Package.” Customers were presented with a list of the circulars Helen had on hand and they checked off the ones that interested them. This is one example of how an old concept can be turned into something new with a twist that makes it YOUR OWN product.

There are several ideas that other mail order folks used to create their own product. You can use the same concept locally also. If you sell vitamins, for instance, you could sell them in individual packets and label them for each day of the week. Use the vitamins from the company you are working with but the individual packets and labels would be your own product. You can also charge more for this personal touch.

You are unique! You are an individual who has special talents and interests. Your business should be a reflection of YOU and your own contribution to mail order. Mail order is a wonderful business, filled with some of the best people in the world. But it’s up to every one of us to keep it that way.

Behavioral And Keyword-triggered Ads — Legal Update For Hot-button Internet Advertising Issues

Copyright 2009 Chip Cooper

Safire’s New Political Dictionary defines “hot-button” as follows: word or issue that ignites anger, fear, enthusiasm, or other passionate response.

Safire’s definition fits two Internet advertising issues – behavioral and keyword ads – perfectly. Two developments in the first few months of 2009 show how these hot-button issues are developing, and how they may ultimately impact Internet advertising in a fundamental way.

Behavioral Advertising

Relevance is a key concept in any advertising. With it, advertisers’ messages hit home with purchasers, and conversions increase. Without it, advertisers’ messages are wasted on blind eyes and deaf ears.

Behavioral ads take Internet advertising to a new level of relevancy. Behavioral technology tracks a user’s behavior on the Web, including sites visited, length of visits, content read, and searches made. All of this data is then analyzed and a behavioral pattern is produced for a user which classifies that user by his or her online demographic. Behavioral ad networks then serve targeted ads that are relevant to that online demographic.

Recent announcements by Google (with its AdSense network) and Facebook that they will begin serving behavioral ads has triggered increased interest in related privacy issues. The concerns: the lack of transparency regarding collection practices and the risk of disclosure of the information collected, particularly sensitive information.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has shown interest in privacy issues related to behavioral ads even before the announcements by Google and Facebook. In November 2007, the FTC conducted a town hall discussion to discuss privacy issues raised by online behavioral advertising. Afterward, the FTC developed proposed principles based on comments received at the town hall discussions.

In February 2009, the FTC issued a staff report entitled “Self-Regulatory Principles For Online Behavioral Advertising” (Principles). The Principles are designed to encourage industry self regulation for the protection of consumer privacy in online advertising activities.

The new development for behavioral ads is that – if three U.S. Congressmen have their way – behavioral ads will move from self-regulation to regulation by a federal statute.

It’s interesting to note that the legislative effort is bi-partisan. Rep. Cliff Stearns (R.-Fla.), Rep. Rick Boucher (D.-Va.) and Rep. Joe Barton (R.-Texas) are working to present a bill to Congress that would regulate behavioral ads. Boucher has stated that websites participating in behavioral ads should be required to obtain explicit permission from a user, plus the requirement to disclose how they collect and use data.

Keyword Advertising

In the last four years or so, cases involving keyword-triggered ads have been hotly litigated. The dispute is now a familiar one — whether a search engine such as Google should permit pay-per-click advertisers to use keywords that are also a competitor’s trademarks for purposes of triggering their ads on a search results page.

Legal issues arise when a competitor purchases a competitor’s trademark as a keyword. The Lanham Act (Federal Trademark Act) prohibits any:

  • “use in commerce”, and
  • “likelihood of confusion”. In order to prevail, a plaintiff must satisfy two of the foregoing elements. The legal battle has focused on the “use in commerce” issue, with courts being hopelessly divided on the issue. Courts finding that keyword-triggered ads are a “use in commerce” favor plaintiffs (the trademark owners). Conversely, courts finding that keyword-triggered ads are not a “use in commerce” favor the defendants (the advertisers – search engines and their advertiser customers). Until April 3, 2009, the 2nd Circuit (Connecticut, New York, and Vermont) has held that use of a trademark in keyword-triggered ads, provided the trademark is internal and not visible, does not amount to “use in commerce” – thereby favoring defendant-advertisers. On April 3, 2009, the 2nd Circuit reversed its position on the “use in commerce” issue. In the case of Rescuecom v. Google, the 2nd Circuit ruled on a Motion to Dismiss that Google’s recommendation and sale of Rescuecom’s trademark to competing advertisers amounted to a “use in commerce”. Although this decision went against Google, Google may still prevail in the case if the court finds later that there is no likelihood of confusion. It’s interesting to note that the majority of Circuit Courts have previously held that similar uses of a trademark amount to a “use in commerce”. Does the reversal by the 2nd Circuit signal a trend that could significantly favor trademark owners against advertisers and close the split among the Circuits? Possibly — and that’s why this decision is so important. Conclusion With the foregoing update, this is where we stand on the two hot-button issues of Internet advertising:
  • behavioral advertising — although the status remains unchanged at present, there is federal regulation in the works that could impose significant privacy regulations in the near future; and * keyword-triggered ads — there’s still a significant split among the Circuits; however, the split has narrowed in favor of trademark owners due to the 2nd Circuit’s ruling in the Rescuecom v. Google case. The 2nd Circuit in its decision suggested that it would make sense for Congress to resolve this split with specific legislation in the future. This article is provided for educational and informative purposes only. This information does not constitute legal advice, and should not be construed as such.

A Retail Store Business Plan – Projecting Revenue

There are two main methods to project revenue for your retail store when creating financial projections for your business plan: a top-down approach and a bottom-up approach. It is advised to use both methods to make sure that your projections are reasonable to readers.

Top-Down Approach

A top-down approach would be to start with an average sales per square feet benchmark for your type of retail establishment. This is defined as total net sales divided by the square feet of selling space. While looking for an industry average, check if there are geographic differences that would affect your store. You can assume that, upon launch, you will be below the industry average, but be able to climb closer to it or above it over time.

You can look for this average sales per square foot with trade associations and publications and in business publications at a library. To get examples, you can apply some calculations to the numbers in annual reports of the large public companies in your industry. You can even ask owners of similar businesses in other states who aren’t in direct competition with you.

However, if you find, for example, that Target has sales of $50 per square foot per year, $50 may be difficult for your store to achieve. Target operates with extreme economies of scale, has a recognizable brand, and has been around for many years. Unless you have reason to believe the specific opportunity for your store will lead to a much greater volume of sales, don’t assume you can do better than industry giants on sales per square foot.

Bottom-Up Approach

To project revenues from the bottom-up, look at your specific situation, starting with the location you expect to be operating at. Estimate the customers who will enter your doors on a given day (adding those who are passing by with those reached through your intended marketing methods), multiply by the percentage you expect to make a purchase, and multiply by the average purchase price. Certainly, a lot of subjective thinking goes into each of these numbers, but, if they are based in some rational process, the end result should be a revenue projection specific to your store.

Compare the number achieved through this method to the top-down approach. You may choose to tinker with the numbers in your bottom-up estimate in order to come closer to the top-down, especially if your estimate exceeds the top-down estimate. In any event, be prepared to explain your methods and sources to funders who may want to know how you thought through these projections.